South and West by Joan Didion

I love Joan Didion’s writing style.

I’m going to preface this by saying non-fiction is not usually my jam unless it is a memoir written by a hilarious women (Amy Poehler, Tina Fey, Anna Kendrick, etc..). Reality is pretty bleak most of the time so I prefer to escape into a book that stretches my imagination and pushes me out of the normal day to day. But, I made an exception because Joan Didion is a literary goddess.

If you have not had the pleasure of reading one of Didion’s novels I’ll give you the cliff notes intro to Joan. She writes in a direct yet lyrical manner. She can make the mundane sound beautiful without removing the fact that it is still mundane. I’ll give you a little excerpt from the West section of the book:

“I am at home in the West. The hills of the coastal ranges look “right” to me, the particular flat expanse of the Central Valley comforts my eye. The place names have the ring of real places to me. I can pronounce the names of the rivers, and recognize the common trees and snakes. I am easy here in a way that I am not easy in other places.”

How gorgeous is that prose? It gives me chills and makes me feel at home at the same time.

Now that we are all caught up let’s dig into the book. South and West is a collection of journal entries from when Joan traveled to the Gulf Coast in 1970 and to San Francisco in 1976. The portion on the South is well over ⅔ of the book and it is mesmerizing. As a rebel by nature she commentates from the perspective of a baffled but genuinely curious Californian. Her commentary on the Gulf is heart wrenching, upsetting and wildly uncomfortable for me to read because there’s a level of acceptance at cultural stagnation.

What I loved about the South section was that she was able to observe the culture and people of this new geographic location while being true to herself. She does not give into the patriarchal society that constantly asks about her husband. Her husband is rarely mentioned in these notes; she aims her focus at the places they travel and conversations she overhears. At the end of South she has painted the picture that the Gulf is a tragic marshland, filled with creatures that would terrify tourists if they weren’t on display and with people who hold tightly to their status quo even if it is to their detriment.

The portion on the West is much shorter. It’s like a love letter to the state Didion called home for her formative years. Didion’s notes are speckled with self-awareness. She includes details on what her normal was as a child which juxtaposes the idyllic childhood of the South through access to cultures alone. California is painted as a place deep with history but without the same reverence behind it. Cultural trends come and go without much consideration for who they leave behind.

I absolutely loved reading through these notes for two pieces she never wrote. Her succinct tone in combination with her ability to identify the toxic symptoms of two cultures without coming off as callous is pure magic. The sections unintentionally explain America as a whole. The South is tied so deeply to their roots they are willing to sink in to the marsh with them and the West is untethered, willing to float off with the next exciting idea. I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys stories from the view of an observer with heavy social commentary.

Have you ready any Didion? If so, what do you think of her style?

But Really Though Reads—You’ll Grow Out Of It by Jessi Klein

For Christmas I received so many beautiful books! One of these was Jessi Klein’s autobiography, “You’ll Grow Out Of It” and this writer/comedian did not disappoint.

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Klein is a writer for Inside Amy Schumer, SNL, Transparent amongst many other works. Not only is she insanely talented with the pen, she is also captivating in conversation (she often appears in NPR’s radio show “Wait..Wait..Don’t Tell Me”). Jessi identifies as a “tom man” meaning she is a tomboy who never “grew out of it”

Jessi Klein is so hilarious and captivating that I finished this book in one sitting. I have not been actively engaged in someone’s story like this since I read Tina Fey’s Bossypants. Klein is a comedic genius and her staccato comedic timing translates perfectly on the page. Reading this memoir felt like a conversation. Klein’s perspective on everything stereotypically feminine, from weddings to the television show The Bachelor, is relatable and refreshing. Klein identifies as female and heterosexual but still finds that she never fits in the feminine box. She is the comedic queen of the not so feminine female.

Without giving away too many of the book’s comedic secrets, my favorite analogy of hers is the Poodle v Wolf. According to Klein, women are categorized as either poodles or wolves and while both are from the same species, they have very different defining characteristics. A poodle is in sync with her feminine side and a wolf is more masculine. Being pretty is not the dividing line between poodles and wolves, poodles are more yin and wolves are more yang. For example, Sofia Vergara would be defined as a poodle while Jennifer Aniston is a wolf. While both are beautiful, it is their personality characteristics that place them in their category. I love that Jessi differentiates between the two without belittling either category. You trot on you beautiful poodle or wolf!

Klein is a genious, a goddess and a wonderful soul. This book is a must read for any misfit with a love for wit.

I’m always on the hunt for new books, leave me some suggestions for my reading list!